SOME QUICK INSIGHTS TO CHAPTER 1: OPEN INNOVATION


• Open Innovation means working with a network of partners to achieve breakthroughs that no single company can achieve on its own
• It demands a change in corporate outlook, and a greater emphasis on partnering skills
• Successful partnerships recognise the differing needs, motivations and cultural backgrounds of the partners, and work with, rather than against them

The full section of the practitioner's guide is available here.

SOME QUICK INSIGHTS TO CHAPTER 2: TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER AND INDUSTRIAL/ACADEMIC RELATIONSHIP


• Recognise the differing skills and motivations of academia and industry: seeking knowledge versus seeking new products or processes
• Recognise the differing time-scales in each type of research
• Recognise the lack of hierarchical power in public research – prepare to persuade rather than command

The full section of the practitioner's guide is availablehere .

SOME QUICK INSIGHTS TO CHAPTER 3: GLOBALISATION AND THE VALUE OF LOCATION



• Rethink your role in the global innovation ecosystem from acting as a starting point or a destination to becoming part of a global web of information flows and relationships of mutual advantage
• Streamline your existing R&D organisation, ensuring it serves current needs rather than just reflecting its historical origins, before expanding offshore
• Secure top-management backing for any R&D globalisation strategy

The full section of the practitioner's guide is available here.

 

SOME QUICK INSIGHTS TO CHAPTER 4: IP MANAGEMENT IN THE AGE OF GLOBALISATION

• Educate your colleagues to think of IP as much as a controlled way to share knowledge as to effectively shield it from abuse
• In open innovation, create deals that are a win for all parties
• Ensure that you have top management backing for any efforts to license technology out of your company

The full section of the practitioner's guide is available here .


SOME QUICK INSIGHTS TO CHAPTER 5: KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT IN THE DIGITAL AGE

• Recognise the importance of KM in an increasingly dynamic business environment
• Think of two main forms of KM: IT solutions and people issues
• Introduce KM tools in a culturally sensitive way so that people from a wide variety of business and geographical backgrounds will use them

The full section of the practitioner's guide is available here .

 

SOME QUICK INSIGHTS TO CHAPTER 6: MAKING THE MOST OF MULTIPLE CULTURES

• Recognise the importance of learning how to work well with other national, international and professional cultures
• Think about the opportunities being created by evolving attitudesto innovation in Europe
• Take the differing motivations of partners into account when planning to collaborate – how can your work together be a win for them in their context, as well as for you in yours?

The full section of the practitioner's guide is available here .


 

SOME QUICK INSIGHTS TO CHAPTER 7: RESPONSIBLE INNOVATION

• There is an increasing amount of dialogue, research and initiativesamong academics, policymakers and governance organisations about the responsibilities of researchers and innovators – activity that is growing in a similar way to that surrounding the concept of sustainability in the 1990s
• ‘Responsible innovation’ asks industry to be more broadly accountable for the consequences of the innovation it undertakes
• Industry needs to engage with the responsible innovation debate to argue the case for managing risk, rather than simply avoiding it, to protect its ability to innovate

The full section of the practitioner's guide is available here. (for EIRMA members only)

A public version is available here